Lies, Lies, and More Lies

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/12/02/not-enough-pinocchios-trumps-crowdstrike-obsession/

Trump: “The Democrats, a lot of it had to do, they say, with Ukraine. It’s very interesting. It’s very interesting. They have this server, right? From the DNC, Democratic National Committee. The FBI went in and they told them, ‘Get out of here. You’re not getting it. We’re not giving it to you.’ They gave the server to CrowdStrike or whatever it’s called, which is a company owned by a very wealthy Ukrainian. And I still want to see that server. You know, the FBI has never gotten that server. That’s a big part of this whole thing. Why did they give it to a Ukrainian company?”

Steve Doocy of “Fox and Friends”: “Are you sure they did that? Are you sure they gave it to Ukraine?”

Trump: “Well, that’s what the word is.”

“The Democrats [What about the Democrats?], a lot of it [A lot of what? What’s “it”?] had to do [do what?], they say[Who?], with Ukraine. It’s very interesting. It’s very interesting [What’s so very interesting? It’s ALL innuendo without coherent substance].They [Who is “they”?] have this server, right[How do you know?]? From the DNC, Democratic National Committee. The FBI went in [Went in where, exactly?] and they [Who is “they”?] told them [Who is “them?], ‘Get out of here [Where is “here”?]. You’re not getting it. We’re [Who is “we”?] not giving it to you [Who is “You”?].’ They [Who is they?] gave the server to CrowdStrike or whatever it’s called [Why don’t you know, or are you unsure, who or what the server was given to?], which is a company owned by a very wealthy Ukrainian [Who? And how do you know?]  [You seem to have so much “information” so why don’t you know or disclose the name?]. And I still want to see that server [Do you even know what a server is? Please define it for us.]. You know [No,We don’t “know”], the FBI has never gotten that server [How do you know this? I thought the FBI was part of the deep state? Wouldn’t they conceal that fact from you?]. That’s a big part of this whole thing [What “whole thing”?]. Why did they give it to a Ukrainian company?[How do you know they did this? Who told you this information? Who is your “Whistleblower?”].”

Steve Doocy of “Fox and Friends”: “Are you sure they did that? Are you sure they gave it to Ukraine?”

Trump: “Well, that’s what the word is.” [Who gave you “the word?” Was it Putin? Where do you get your information? Where do you get your gossip? Or is this just made up out of “whole cloth”].

Whole cloth (uncountable) (figuratively, used attributively or preceded by various prepositions); The fictitious material from which complete fabrications, lies with no basis in truth, are made.

Something made completely new, with no history, and not based on anything else.

Trump talks like this almost all the time, but especially when he is evading questions or flat-out lying. He chooses repetitious, vague, simplistic descriptive language, and overly broad generalities which he infuses with repetitive innuendos. Most of his innuendoes are rooted in blatant accusatory lies he has uttered in the past. In those events when Trump is actually praising or commending someone or some group, his speech patterns are usually laced with the same ridiculously vagarious, broad, vague, and vacuous generalities. He talks like a snake oil salesman.

Trump characteristically attacks people with impunity, making outrageously vile and provably untrue and damaging accusations which appeal to those who thrive on the hatred and suspicion of specific individuals, groups of Americans and immigrants alike. He does so without a shred of proof, devoid of any reality-based, rational or logically connected thought. He relentlessly attacks on so many fronts, with so many targets, it’s overwhelming and difficult to parse the components of his incoherent rants and accusations.

His supporters seem nourished, energized, delighted by Trump’s caustic vileness and vitriol. They lap up the destructive emotional feelings expressed through his corrosive rhetoric and derive a cathartic, vicarious sense of personal power and retribution over Trump’s carefully crafted enemies, foreign and domestic, their fellow Americans. It appeals to a sadistic thirst for revenge against all their grievances and enemies, real and imagined. It is a massive catharsis for their deeply held beliefs, prejudices and raw emotion.

Trump is a master manipulator. He learned from the “best” – Roy Cohn, and most likely his father. He admires demagogues, dictators, autocrats, and tyrants. He has likely studied them in his own fashion, although not likely from reading. The American tragedy is the numbers of Americans who feel so powerful having their thoughts and feelings manipulated and targeted by Trump. A manipulation enabled by a failure to examine and reflect upon their core American values. Skillfully influenced by failing to critically examine the substance, truth and credibility of Trump’s words, and weighing how they match his actions, his vacillations, his “evolving” accounts of his “truths.

There are massive contradictions, numerous examples of lies and evasion. Unfortunately for American Democracy, the Republicans in Congress are actively or passively complicit in Trump’s dangerous charade. Trump is America’s first Fake President, who aspires to be her first Monarch or dictator since we fought the Revolutionary War against King George. Some Americans even believe Trump to be divine providence. What happened to “beware false idols?” For it is plainly obvious his core followers idolize him in a perverse, unblinking, unflinching swoon of idolatry.

Sticks and Stones, Guns and Knives, and Even Bombs

On January 10, 2011, BOB HERBERT who writes for the New York Times posted an article online entitled “A Flood Tide of Murder.” (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/11/opinion/11herbert.html?_r=0 ) In the introductory paragraph of the article he talked about the poisonous political rhetoric of politicians and some of the “news” commentators designed to appeal to the popular fears, desires, conventional “wisdom,” and prejudices, rather than employing rational argument and critical thinking skills to seek meaningful solutions to difficult, complex problems like gun violence. This is an endemic problem which significantly impedes finding meaningful, effective solutions to many other problems in this country and American culture, including the homeless problems, the healthcare situation, and the the unrealistic, biased perceptions of what it means to be poor in America.

As Mr. Herbert points out in his article, “crazies” (which includes, in my opinion, the mentally ill and imbalanced, but also the religious and political fanatics) do not come to the decision to kill in a vacuum. Their ideas, frustrations, prejudices, biases, fears and feelings of desperation are gradually, often unconsciously assimilated or absorbed from the opinions, ideas, and the conventional “wisdom” or “facts” expressed by members of their own family, their friends, neighbors, classmates, co-workers, and from the movies, books, television and other forms of media they attend to. When children and young people are developing their minds and discovering who they are as human beings in our society and the world they are like sponges, soaking up the information, attitudes and relationships they observe around them. They see, hear and emotionally feel the complex, subtle nuances of the ways in which people relate, or fail to relate to one another.

These impressionable young humans are keenly aware of a multitude of verbal and non-verbal social cues for behavior: the way people talk to one another, or don’t; the emotional expressions or repressions of feelings directed toward others and themselves; the manner in which some people shun or avoid certain groups or types of people; their facial expressions while regarding individuals, or groups of individuals; the names they call others and the jokes they tell about them; the way some people characterize or denigrate the inherent value of other people; the way people dismiss or write-off certain groups of people, characterizing them as lazy, “takers”, poor, irresponsible, or the 47%, as a whole, without knowledge or regard for the unique stories of the individuals, which might temper their prejudice with compassion and empathy.

All of these, and the almost infinite, subtle nuances of human communication transmit a large quantity of erroneous, distorted and emotionally-charged perceptions of other people in our own society, as well as those in other countries. Some of this subtle and nuanced information is transmitted without the conscious awareness of the individual. It is similar to the process of dehumanization in the case of nations, where the people are perceived as the “enemy,” and therefore sub-human, and unworthy of the same basic respect, value and dignity every human being deserves – suddenly, its extremely easy and expedient to make exceptions to the American value that “All men are created equal.” Wars with some countries seems to be an inevitable possibility, at least in the short term, but mankind has made some amazing strides in knowledge, philosophy, and scientific, technological achievements. Perhaps it’s time to allow ourselves to evolve to a point where we don’t default too easily to dehumanizing people who are different from ourselves, simply because of cultural, religious or political views.

Today, within our society, we are faced with polarized political and cultural factions, with many Americans on the continuum in between. American citizens holding positions of power, authority, and celebrity, who possess the public trust, use vile, morally bereft, and vacuous rhetoric to create fear, anxiety, and deeply rooted distrust of our government. They demonize, accuse and blame the other side of evil, un-American agendas, and subversive, destructive intent to destroy everything from religion to the American military, and the Second Amendment. They create fear among good people who don’t know who to believe, and think about the issues and the “enemy” other side from an emotional, fear-based perspective. They even create distrust of the major news organizations so many people do not trust any “news” program except Fox “News” and Rush Limbaugh.

This type of “common wisdom” about other people, and classes of people is, unfortunately, ALL too common, and it can spread like a virus through human minds, facilitated by ignorance, fear, lack of critical thinking, and a failure to question the perceived authority of leaders and their “conventional” or “common wisdom.” And by leaders, I mean parents, older family members, neighbors, teachers, religious leaders, politicians, law enforcement, military, and other citizens who are influential in our communities and society. Each of us has a serious and sacred responsibility to carefully measure our words and our values, and endeavor to keep our biases, prejudices, and conventional “wisdom” to ourselves, if we unable to overcome them.

Continue reading Sticks and Stones, Guns and Knives, and Even Bombs

A slight digression, or some of my backstory, pre-law enforcement

“He [the student of politics] must also be on his guard against the old words, for the words persist when the reality that lay behind them has changed. It is inherent in our intellectual activity that we seek to imprison reality in our description of it. Soon, long before we realize it , it is we who become the prisoners of the description. From that point on, our ideas degenerate into a kind of folklore which we pass to each other, fondly thinking we are still talking of the reality around us.

Thus we talk of free enterprise, of capitalist society, of the rights of free association, of parliamentary government, as though all of these words stand for the same things they formerly did. Social institutions are what they do, not necessarily what we say they do. It is the verb that matters, not the noun.

If this is not understood, we become symbol worshipers. The categories we once evolved and which were the tools we used in our intercourse with reality become hopelessly blunted. In these circumstances the social and political realities we are supposed to be grappling with change and reshape themselves independently of the collective impact of our ideas. We become the creature and no longer the partner of social realities. As we fumble with outworn categories our political vitality is sucked away and we stumble from one situation to another, without chart, without compass, and with the steering wheel lashed to a course we are no longer following.

This is the real point of danger for a political party and for the leaders and thinkers who inspire it. For if they are out of touch with reality, the masses are not.”

Aneurin Bevan from “In Place of Fear

Notes fromLanguage In Thought and Action
By S.I. Hayakawa and Alan R. Hayakawa, 5th Edition

Continue reading A slight digression, or some of my backstory, pre-law enforcement